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No Justice Granted in the Breonna Taylor Case


Hours after a Kentucky grand jury brought no charges against the three Louisville police officers for Breonna Taylor’s death and protesters took to the streets in rage. The protest have continued to break out in raves all across America expressing anger over the killings of Black people at the hands of police.


It was announced yesterday that prosecutor made a decision about the two officers who fired their weapons at Taylor, the officers were justified in using force to protect themselves after they faced gunfire from her boyfriend. The only charges were three counts of wanton endangerment against fired Officer Brett Hankison for shooting into a home next to Taylor’s with people inside.


The FBI is still investigating potential violations of federal law in connection with the raid at Taylor’s home on March 13.


Taylor, an emergency medical worker, was shot multiple times by white officers who entered her home during a narcotics investigation. State Attorney General Daniel Cameron said that while the officers had a no-knock warrant, the investigation showed they announced themselves before entering. The warrant used to search her home was connected to a suspect who did not live there, and no drugs were found inside.


Ben Crump, a lawyer for Taylor’s family, denounced the decision as “outrageous and offensive,” and protesters shouting, “No justice, no peace!” immediately marched through the streets.


Scuffles broke out between police and protesters, and some were arrested. Officers fired flash bangs and a few small fires burned in a square that’s been at the center of protests, but it had largely cleared out ahead of a nighttime curfew as demonstrators marched through other parts of downtown Louisville. Dozens of patrol cars blocked the city’s major thoroughfare.


Demonstrators also marched in cities like New York, Chicago, Washington, D.C., Atlanta and Philadelphia.


The announcement drew sadness, frustration and anger that the grand jury did not go further. The wanton endangerment charges each carry a sentence of up to five years. The other two officers who also fired shots during the botched March raid were not indicted, meaning no officer was charged with killing Taylor.


Cameron said an FBI crime lab determined that Cosgrove fired the bullet that killed Taylor.


Taylor’s boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, opened fire when police burst in, hitting Mattingly. Walker told police he heard knocking but didn’t know who was coming in and fired in self-defense.


Hankison was fired on June 23. A termination letter sent by interim Louisville Police Chief Robert Schroeder said he had violated procedures by showing “extreme indifference to the value of human life” when he “wantonly and blindly” fired his weapon.


Mattingly, Cosgrove and the detective who sought the warrant, Joshua Jaynes, were placed administrative reassignment.


Last week, the city settled a lawsuit against the three officers brought by Taylor’s mother, Tamika Palmer, agreeing to pay her $12 million and enact police reforms.



Source: CNN, AP NEW, FOX NEWS

Our Recent Posts

Tags

No Justice Granted in the Breonna Taylor Case


Hours after a Kentucky grand jury brought no charges against the three Louisville police officers for Breonna Taylor’s death and protesters took to the streets in rage. The protest have continued to break out in raves all across America expressing anger over the killings of Black people at the hands of police.


It was announced yesterday that prosecutor made a decision about the two officers who fired their weapons at Taylor, the officers were justified in using force to protect themselves after they faced gunfire from her boyfriend. The only charges were three counts of wanton endangerment against fired Officer Brett Hankison for shooting into a home next to Taylor’s with people inside.


The FBI is still investigating potential violations of federal law in connection with the raid at Taylor’s home on March 13.


Taylor, an emergency medical worker, was shot multiple times by white officers who entered her home during a narcotics investigation. State Attorney General Daniel Cameron said that while the officers had a no-knock warrant, the investigation showed they announced themselves before entering. The warrant used to search her home was connected to a suspect who did not live there, and no drugs were found inside.


Ben Crump, a lawyer for Taylor’s family, denounced the decision as “outrageous and offensive,” and protesters shouting, “No justice, no peace!” immediately marched through the streets.


Scuffles broke out between police and protesters, and some were arrested. Officers fired flash bangs and a few small fires burned in a square that’s been at the center of protests, but it had largely cleared out ahead of a nighttime curfew as demonstrators marched through other parts of downtown Louisville. Dozens of patrol cars blocked the city’s major thoroughfare.


Demonstrators also marched in cities like New York, Chicago, Washington, D.C., Atlanta and Philadelphia.


The announcement drew sadness, frustration and anger that the grand jury did not go further. The wanton endangerment charges each carry a sentence of up to five years. The other two officers who also fired shots during the botched March raid were not indicted, meaning no officer was charged with killing Taylor.


Cameron said an FBI crime lab determined that Cosgrove fired the bullet that killed Taylor.


Taylor’s boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, opened fire when police burst in, hitting Mattingly. Walker told police he heard knocking but didn’t know who was coming in and fired in self-defense.


Hankison was fired on June 23. A termination letter sent by interim Louisville Police Chief Robert Schroeder said he had violated procedures by showing “extreme indifference to the value of human life” when he “wantonly and blindly” fired his weapon.


Mattingly, Cosgrove and the detective who sought the warrant, Joshua Jaynes, were placed administrative reassignment.


Last week, the city settled a lawsuit against the three officers brought by Taylor’s mother, Tamika Palmer, agreeing to pay her $12 million and enact police reforms.



Source: CNN, AP NEW, FOX NEWS

Our Recent Posts

Tags

No Justice Granted in the Breonna Taylor Case


Hours after a Kentucky grand jury brought no charges against the three Louisville police officers for Breonna Taylor’s death and protesters took to the streets in rage. The protest have continued to break out in raves all across America expressing anger over the killings of Black people at the hands of police.


It was announced yesterday that prosecutor made a decision about the two officers who fired their weapons at Taylor, the officers were justified in using force to protect themselves after they faced gunfire from her boyfriend. The only charges were three counts of wanton endangerment against fired Officer Brett Hankison for shooting into a home next to Taylor’s with people inside.


The FBI is still investigating potential violations of federal law in connection with the raid at Taylor’s home on March 13.


Taylor, an emergency medical worker, was shot multiple times by white officers who entered her home during a narcotics investigation. State Attorney General Daniel Cameron said that while the officers had a no-knock warrant, the investigation showed they announced themselves before entering. The warrant used to search her home was connected to a suspect who did not live there, and no drugs were found inside.


Ben Crump, a lawyer for Taylor’s family, denounced the decision as “outrageous and offensive,” and protesters shouting, “No justice, no peace!” immediately marched through the streets.


Scuffles broke out between police and protesters, and some were arrested. Officers fired flash bangs and a few small fires burned in a square that’s been at the center of protests, but it had largely cleared out ahead of a nighttime curfew as demonstrators marched through other parts of downtown Louisville. Dozens of patrol cars blocked the city’s major thoroughfare.


Demonstrators also marched in cities like New York, Chicago, Washington, D.C., Atlanta and Philadelphia.


The announcement drew sadness, frustration and anger that the grand jury did not go further. The wanton endangerment charges each carry a sentence of up to five years. The other two officers who also fired shots during the botched March raid were not indicted, meaning no officer was charged with killing Taylor.


Cameron said an FBI crime lab determined that Cosgrove fired the bullet that killed Taylor.


Taylor’s boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, opened fire when police burst in, hitting Mattingly. Walker told police he heard knocking but didn’t know who was coming in and fired in self-defense.


Hankison was fired on June 23. A termination letter sent by interim Louisville Police Chief Robert Schroeder said he had violated procedures by showing “extreme indifference to the value of human life” when he “wantonly and blindly” fired his weapon.


Mattingly, Cosgrove and the detective who sought the warrant, Joshua Jaynes, were placed administrative reassignment.


Last week, the city settled a lawsuit against the three officers brought by Taylor’s mother, Tamika Palmer, agreeing to pay her $12 million and enact police reforms.



Source: CNN, AP NEW, FOX NEWS

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